How are designers tackling health and climate issues by planning more adaptable cities?
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How are designers tackling health and climate issues by planning more adaptable cities?

THE PLAN JOURNAL TAKES ANOTHER LOOK AT HEALTHY URBANISM AND LANDSCAPE URBANISM

How are designers tackling health and climate issues by planning more adaptable cities?
By Editorial Staff -

We are presenting some interesting ideas from The Plan Journal’s sections on Healthy Urbanism and Landscape Urbanism.

In the first contribution from the Healthy Urbanism section “Open-Air-Space: Inclusive Involvement within a Public Health Crisis,” the author Ulysses Sean Vance’s research project “conceptually revisits the open-air spaces of hospitals.” In the second contribution “New Healthy Settlements Responding to Pandemic Outbreaks: Approaches form (and for) the Global City,” the authors Luca Maria Francesco Fabris, Federico Camerin, Gerardo Semprebon and Riccardo Maria Balzarotti address “several solutions and strategies for tackling urban inequalities” … “based on early social science works by Emily Skinner and Jeffrey R. Masuda (2013) and then developed as a urban planning component by the interdisciplinary research group Barcelona Lab for Urban Environmental Justice and Sustainability (2019).”

The third contribution is an article from the Landscape Urbanism section entitled “Chicago’s Urban Rivers,” written by Carol Ross Barney. Barney explains: 

“For nearly two decades, Ross Barney Architects has been working along Chicago’s rivers. These efforts include the design of the Chicago Riverwalk, studies on all 150 mi. [241 km] of riverfront across the city, and an exhibition at the Chicago Architecture Biennial.”

Finally, we learn from Preserving Los Angeles.

>> We encourage you to browse The Plan Journal and explore for yourself. 

 

Urbanism

In the essay “Open-Air-Space: Inclusive Involvement within a Public Health Crisis,” the author Ulysses Sean Vance explains:

The project discussions went from applying facility compliance to methods of helping people. It involved assessing mobility, hospitality, information, and waste management—the four primary criteria interrogating the functionality of building edges and interior core spaces. 

 Ulysses Sean Vance, Open-Air-Space Student-Faculty City Clinic at Broad Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue. Visual fiction depicting the micro hospital’s self-contained meditation pond and walking track for patients and caregivers. Courtesy of © Igli Toshi (Temple University Tyler School of Art and Architecture).Ulysses Sean Vance, Weiss Hall anxiety clinic interventions at 13th Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue, south entrance. Daytime curbside check-in highlighting augmented reality projections for monitoring personal health data and information on maintaining social distancing due to health concerns. Courtesy of © Igli Toshi (Temple University Tyler School of Art and Architecture).

 

Vance continues: 

The work included programmatically inverting the management systems for care by establishing testing sites that prioritized both patient and medical team wellness in determining the hierarchy of room arrangements and locations for patients’ decision-making, alone or with family.

>> The essay is available in THE PLAN Journal vol. 5/2020, no. 2 (in English)

In the article “New Healthy Settlements Responding to Pandemic Outbreaks: Approaches form (and for) the Global City,” the authors Luca Maria Francesco Fabris, Federico Camerin, Gerardo Semprebon and Riccardo Maria Balzarotti explain that “micro-scale and capillary interventions, promotion of neighbourhood identities, accessibility to services and quality public spaces are the focal points for the development of a healthier city.” 

 Luca Maria Francesco Fabris, Federico Camerin, Gerardo Semprebon and Riccardo Maria Balzarotti, The Tactical Urbanism intervention in Pacini Street, Milan. Photo by © Luca Maria Francesco Fabris, 2020.Luca Maria Francesco Fabris, Federico Camerin, Gerardo Semprebon and Riccardo Maria Balzarotti, The Tactical Urbanism intervention in Pacini Street, Milan. Photo by © Luca Maria Francesco Fabris, 2020.

 

Fabris et al. continue: 

"It is possible to say, in a consequential vision, that if the healthy city is the ‘scope,’ the 15-minute city is the ‘strategy,’ the addition of local services and connection is the ‘method,’ and the Tactical Urbanism is the ‘tool’."

>> The article is available in THE PLAN Journal vol. 5/2020, no. 2 (in English)

 

In the article “Chicago’s Urban Rivers,” author Carol Ross Barney explains: 

"Our Great Rivers’ is an unprecedented effort to create and coordinate a long-term vision for economic and community development along one-hundred-and-fifty-miles [241 km] of Chicago’s riverfronts."

 Carol Ross Barney, the Jetty. Photos by © Kate Joyce.Carol Ross Barney, the Jetty. Photos by © Kate Joyce.

 

Barney continues to explain: 

“The vision is a guide, not a mandate, meant to create expectations and establish priorities, not hinder flexibility or creativity. Goals established for each decade outline a unified brand for the rivers by 2020, transformed port districts and industrial corridors by 2030, and water quality improvements and habitat restoration by 2040.”

>> The abstract is available in THE PLAN Journal vol. 3/2018, no. 1 (in English)

 

Preserving Los Angeles

Preserving Los Angeles (2021) is written by Ken Bernstein, head of the Office of Historic Resources in the Los Angeles Department of City Planning. This book demonstrates ways in which historic preservation and careful city planning can strengthen a city rich with cultural heritage. There are many lessons to be learned from Los Angeles.

 Preserving Los Angeles

256 pages
300+ images
9"h x 9"w
hardcover; ISBN 978-1-62640-075-7; $50.00

To learn more, check out: https://www.angelcitypress.com/products/prla

 

Why support + read TPJ?

The Plan Journal is intended to disseminate and promote innovative, thought-provoking, and relevant research, studies, and criticism related to architecture and urbanism. The journal grew out of an awareness that academia is all too often engaged in research that’s disconnected from the real-world challenges that face different professions, and that research is only possible for a small number of professional organizations, and, even then, with limited platforms for its dissemination. The overarching aim of TPJ is therefore to enrich the dialogue between researchers and professionals so as to foster both pertinent new knowledge and intellectually driven modes of practice.

 

How does it work + why does it matter?

Prospective contributors are encouraged to submit proposals or complete manuscripts to the Editor-in-Chief. Subject to positive feedback, proposals can then be developed into complete manuscripts and submitted for review, using the dedicated portal on the TPJ website. 

After preliminary approval, manuscripts will be forwarded to suitably qualified people for commenting. TPJ is committed to following a rigorous double-blind peer review process using at least two reviewers. The Editor-in-Chief may also occasionally invite recognized academics, critics, or professionals (including members of the editorial board) to contribute to the journal without going through the peer review process, if warranted by the author’s reputation.

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