rome MAPPING A GOOD GOVERNANCE CHALLENGE FOR AN OPEN SUSTAINABLE CITY | The Plan
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rome MAPPING A GOOD GOVERNANCE CHALLENGE FOR AN OPEN SUSTAINABLE CITY

rome MAPPING A GOOD GOVERNANCE CHALLENGE FOR AN OPEN SUSTAINABLE CITY
By Andrea Boschetti, Federico Parolotto -

After the cities and metropolises of the five continents, TheCityPlan returns to Italy. A year and a half after examining Milan, we now turn to the capital, Rome, known the world over as “the Eternal City”. Today, Rome extends for about 1,200 km² and has 2.8 million inhabitants. As usual, TheCityPlan research team examines the city with the aid of five, GIS-based maps providing a series of snapshots of key features: population density, topography, service provision, public transport and urban vegetation. Analyzing the same features for each city in our series not only provides an in-depth picture of each city. It also allows inter-city comparison and throws light on how urban development policies have been implemented. Rome’s population map shows areas of high residential density right up to the historic center, i.e. where most of its famous historical buildings and monuments are concentrated: the area containing Vatican City, the sequence of splendid Baroque churches - Sant’Andrea al Quirinale, San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane and Santa Maria Bittoria - the Imperial Fora and Coliseum. Although still in the heart of the old center, the neighborhoods around Piazza Navona, the Pantheon and Campo de’ Fiori present slightly higher population density - for the lucky few who can afford to live there. But the bulk of Rome’s population is clearly concentrated further afield, although within the perimeter created by the outer ring road, the Grande Raccordo Anulare (GRA) that encircles the city. Residential density presents in large patches. This is on account of both the hilly topography and the extensive areas of urban greenery, as shown by the relevant maps. As well as its large and quite extraordinary parks, like Villa Borghese and Doria Pamphilj, set into the urban structure, Rome also has green areas on its famous seven hills. Within the GRA perimeter, the city’s complex urban structure is characterized by a dense web of streets that form a fragmented hierarchized...

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