LIFE AFTER LOCKDOWN – ABSTRACT 3
  1. Home
  2. Architettura
  3. LIFE AFTER LOCKDOWN – ABSTRACT 3

LIFE AFTER LOCKDOWN – ABSTRACT 3

HOW THE WORLD WILL BE DIFFERENT AFTER COVID-19

3 July 2020

Abstract 3 is the third weekly check-in with the people interpreting The New Tomorrow, our new feature in which architects and important thinkers share their visions of how architecture will change and what the world will look like post-lockdown.

Abstracts 1 and Abstract 2 showcased the thoughts of some famous interpreters of contemporary architecture, including Stefan Behnisch, Patrik Schumacher, Sergei Tchoban, Steven Holl, and Kim Herforth Nielsen. In Abstract 3, we’ve summarized eight more video selfies in which architects and thinkers share their ideas about the post-Covid-19 world and its architecture.

Abstracts 1
Abstract 2

Ben Van Berkel – Onto the next phase of designing the future
Ben Van Berkel of UNStudio believes there will be changes in the way cities are designed in the future. But, he cautions, we must be patient: We need to avoid rushing things with designs that are too radical. The next phase will happen; and, when it does, it will be all about innovation.

See on youtube
Read on The Plan

Mario Cucinella – Calling from planet Earth: A new space-time dimension
Mario Cucinella of MCA has contacted us from planet Earth to talk about how the current period has opened a new space-time dimension that pushes us to reflect on the importance of nature, social life, and the environment.

See on youtube
Read on The Plan


Carmen Andriani – Country in the city / Living in the distance
Carmen Andriani, architect and professor of architecture and urban design at the University of Genoa, is interested in the effects the current pandemic is having on our urban environments. While the emergency has turned our daily routines on their head, it’s also brought about an anti-urban trend in our cities that has changed the way they operate. This upheaval has the potential to produce a new urban vision – one that’s more focused on safe mobility, new in-person relationships, and harnessing the full potential of the empty spaces that dot our cities and their outskirts.

See on youtube

967 Architetti – An opportunity for genuine change
Cesare Chichi of 967 Architetti Associati also sees future changes in the fields of design, urban planning, and architectural legislation. He hopes, though, that these changes won’t simply be opportunistic or just pay lip service to a new vision.

See on youtube
Read on The Plan


Aires Mateus and Associados – Reacting by designing spaces for our freedom
Architecture is a reaction to, and a mirror of, the times in which we live. Aires Mateus is convinced that this current period of upheaval will push architecture into focusing more on the importance of private space: The spaces of our personal freedom.

See on youtube
Read on The Plan

Ivano Dionigi –
After Prometheus, we need Socrates
Technology has helped us maintain social contact during this difficult time. But it won’t be enough to solve all of our newly emerging challenges. Ivano Dionigi invites us to not only consider the answers we’ll need to have in this imminent future, but also the questions we’ll need to ask ourselves. If Prometheus shows us how we can respond to life’s difficulties, then it’s Socrates who, by bringing philosophy down from the heavens, shows us how we can all address these questions and answers together, using a new, shared language.

See on youtube
Read on The Plan

Andreas Profanter
– Changing our approach to stay who we are
Andreas Profanter of noa* wonders about the new safety measures that architecture will need to incorporate so that we can maintain social distancing, such as in the creation of different kinds of public spaces. But whatever this new approach looks like, it shouldn’t be a reason for giving up our Italian spirit, which is all about socializing, embracing life and each other, and sharing a decent coffee.

See on youtube
Read on The Plan

Gianandrea Barreca
– A wish list for the future
The only way not to lose the progress we’ve made during this challenging period is to preserve it in our collective memory. Gianandrea Barreca, from Studio barreca&lavarra, suggests that we should all make a wish list of the things we want to take with us into the future, such as silence, the magnificent sun, and the memory of a balcony – or of some other small, everyday place – that quarantine has helped us rediscover.

See on youtube
Read on The Plan

 

 

 


© Maggioli SpA • THE PLAN • Via del Pratello 8 • 40122 Bologna, Italy • T +39 051 227634 • P. IVA 02066400405 • ISSN 2499-6602 • E-ISSN 2385-2054